Irish Soda Bread Class
       
     
 A long table was set up so we could all work together on our dough.
       
     
 We jumped right into it! We dumped the flour, baking soda and a little at bran in and did a quick mix by hand...
       
     
 Next added some milk and mixed (still by hand)...
       
     
 You form the dough into a ball, mark a cross on it...
       
     
 ...and stick it on a floured pan to bake. (Our toothpicks were to help us track down our individual loaves later.)
       
     
 While our bread baked, we enjoyed some snacks and already-made soda bread in our church basement classroom.
       
     
 This event was one week after the marmalade meet-up so I was interested to taste the commercially-produced marmalade they had on hand. I sorta think my marmalady friends' marmalades were better.
       
     
 Coffee at the ready.
       
     
 As we snacked, Mary Shirane, our teacher, talked about her experiences coming to Seattle ("too long ago" she joked) from Ireland.
       
     
 And Mary's granddaughters treated us to a spontaneous Irish dancing demo.
       
     
 The bread was so easy and quick to put together, Mary looked around for some other dishes to show us. She whipped up some colcannon and some carrots and parsnips.
       
     
 Colcannon is a traditional Irish dish made from potatoes, cabbage, and milk or cream. It's topped with scallions. Mary is from Carlow county in Ireland. It's the second smallest county in Ireland, and folks there, she said, are known as the "scallion eaters."
       
     
 After a quick boil and mash, the colcannon came together.
       
     
 Meanwhile, she was also boiling some carrots and parsnips together.
       
     
 These were just roughly chopped with a fork. I asked her why this method and she said "There's only so much mashing one can do." In a country famous for its potato-eating, one would imagine folks would want something with a little tooth to it.
       
     
 We served them up. I am part Irish and part Polish, so I am genetically predisposed to enjoy root vegetables with butter. So I guess take it with a grain of salt, but I thought these were great!
       
     
 Then our bread came out!
       
     
 And Fionna Shriane-Travis, Mary's daughter, showed us how you can tap the bread to hear it's hollow (and therefore done.)
       
     
 We got to take our soda bread home, and I enjoyed it all week toasted and topped with butter and my own marmalade. Check out recipes for both colcannon and soda bread from a local chef here: http://www.freshpickedseattle.com/home/2013/3/12/an-uncommon-colcannon-irish-soda-bread-recipes-from-chef-les.html
       
     
Irish Soda Bread Class
       
     
Irish Soda Bread Class

February 23, 2013: This class was held at the St. Patrick's church and put on by the Irish Heritage Club as one of the many festivities leading up to St. Patrick's Day.

 A long table was set up so we could all work together on our dough.
       
     

A long table was set up so we could all work together on our dough.

 We jumped right into it! We dumped the flour, baking soda and a little at bran in and did a quick mix by hand...
       
     

We jumped right into it! We dumped the flour, baking soda and a little at bran in and did a quick mix by hand...

 Next added some milk and mixed (still by hand)...
       
     

Next added some milk and mixed (still by hand)...

 You form the dough into a ball, mark a cross on it...
       
     

You form the dough into a ball, mark a cross on it...

 ...and stick it on a floured pan to bake. (Our toothpicks were to help us track down our individual loaves later.)
       
     

...and stick it on a floured pan to bake. (Our toothpicks were to help us track down our individual loaves later.)

 While our bread baked, we enjoyed some snacks and already-made soda bread in our church basement classroom.
       
     

While our bread baked, we enjoyed some snacks and already-made soda bread in our church basement classroom.

 This event was one week after the marmalade meet-up so I was interested to taste the commercially-produced marmalade they had on hand. I sorta think my marmalady friends' marmalades were better.
       
     

This event was one week after the marmalade meet-up so I was interested to taste the commercially-produced marmalade they had on hand. I sorta think my marmalady friends' marmalades were better.

 Coffee at the ready.
       
     

Coffee at the ready.

 As we snacked, Mary Shirane, our teacher, talked about her experiences coming to Seattle ("too long ago" she joked) from Ireland.
       
     

As we snacked, Mary Shirane, our teacher, talked about her experiences coming to Seattle ("too long ago" she joked) from Ireland.

 And Mary's granddaughters treated us to a spontaneous Irish dancing demo.
       
     

And Mary's granddaughters treated us to a spontaneous Irish dancing demo.

 The bread was so easy and quick to put together, Mary looked around for some other dishes to show us. She whipped up some colcannon and some carrots and parsnips.
       
     

The bread was so easy and quick to put together, Mary looked around for some other dishes to show us. She whipped up some colcannon and some carrots and parsnips.

 Colcannon is a traditional Irish dish made from potatoes, cabbage, and milk or cream. It's topped with scallions. Mary is from Carlow county in Ireland. It's the second smallest county in Ireland, and folks there, she said, are known as the "scallion eaters."
       
     

Colcannon is a traditional Irish dish made from potatoes, cabbage, and milk or cream. It's topped with scallions. Mary is from Carlow county in Ireland. It's the second smallest county in Ireland, and folks there, she said, are known as the "scallion eaters."

 After a quick boil and mash, the colcannon came together.
       
     

After a quick boil and mash, the colcannon came together.

 Meanwhile, she was also boiling some carrots and parsnips together.
       
     

Meanwhile, she was also boiling some carrots and parsnips together.

 These were just roughly chopped with a fork. I asked her why this method and she said "There's only so much mashing one can do." In a country famous for its potato-eating, one would imagine folks would want something with a little tooth to it.
       
     

These were just roughly chopped with a fork. I asked her why this method and she said "There's only so much mashing one can do." In a country famous for its potato-eating, one would imagine folks would want something with a little tooth to it.

 We served them up. I am part Irish and part Polish, so I am genetically predisposed to enjoy root vegetables with butter. So I guess take it with a grain of salt, but I thought these were great!
       
     

We served them up. I am part Irish and part Polish, so I am genetically predisposed to enjoy root vegetables with butter. So I guess take it with a grain of salt, but I thought these were great!

 Then our bread came out!
       
     

Then our bread came out!

 And Fionna Shriane-Travis, Mary's daughter, showed us how you can tap the bread to hear it's hollow (and therefore done.)
       
     

And Fionna Shriane-Travis, Mary's daughter, showed us how you can tap the bread to hear it's hollow (and therefore done.)

 We got to take our soda bread home, and I enjoyed it all week toasted and topped with butter and my own marmalade. Check out recipes for both colcannon and soda bread from a local chef here: http://www.freshpickedseattle.com/home/2013/3/12/an-uncommon-colcannon-irish-soda-bread-recipes-from-chef-les.html
       
     

We got to take our soda bread home, and I enjoyed it all week toasted and topped with butter and my own marmalade. Check out recipes for both colcannon and soda bread from a local chef here: http://www.freshpickedseattle.com/home/2013/3/12/an-uncommon-colcannon-irish-soda-bread-recipes-from-chef-les.html